Serenity is not the enemy

By definition, serenity is the wrong title for this film. But, as it happens, serenity does not describe the events that take place in this movie. It’s the name of a boat belonging to Baker Dill (Matthew McConaughey). This movie is a compound constituted of many elements. It has the unrelenting determination of Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea, mixed with the coordinated social situations of The Truman Show, along with plot twists reminiscent of Vanilla Sky. Critics comprehensively massacred this movie in their reviews, but it’s got style, verve, and good intentions. The space between what this film attempts to be and what it is large, but it’s hardly forgettable. When watching this movie, think of the impressive cast, the beautiful scenery, and good sex. All things considering, this movie is a bit of alright.

Welcome to Plymouth Island, where everyone knows everything about everybody, but paradoxically, they know nothing at all. There’s one bar, a local idiot, and a lot of fishing. Baker Dill, a local fisherman, is entranced by a very particular fish, a tuna he’s named “Justice.” Dill’s ex-wife Karen (Anne Hathaway) shows up out of nowhere to make a proposition he can’t refuse. She offers him ten million dollars to cancel her abusive husband.

For the gamers, you will find that this movie is representative of future gaming. I won’t say more about that, you must find out on your own. You might like it, love it, hate it, or be indifferent about it. But as I said before, it’s hardly forgettable. Movies aren’t always about analyzing what’s wrong with the film. Strip away the plot points that may be unbecoming, and what is left might be something you enjoy. Many critics fail to realize this. This isn’t about technicalities; it’s about emotions, and emotions are astir in this enticing thriller. See this film, but only on your own terms.

Genre: Thriller
Rating: 2.95/5