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Brewers Returning To ‘Ball And Glove’ Logo; Unveil New Uniforms

Fresh off their second playoff appearance in as many years, the Milwaukee Brewers are rumored to be making a significant uniform change.

The Milwaukee Brewers "ball-and-glove" logo is back. (Scott Anderson, Patch Staff )

MILWAUKEE, WI — The Milwaukee Brewers classic “ball-and-glove” logo is back.

Speaking before an audience on Monday, Nov. 18, at Miller Park, Milwaukee Brewers owner Mark Attanasio unveiled the new look in recognition of the team’s 50 years of baseball.

Tonight, on Nov. 18, Attanasio made it official: the Milwaukee Brewers are going back – in a way – to the fabled logo.

When he became the principal owner of the Milwaukee Brewers in 2005, he said his number one request from the fans was to introduce the ball-and-glove logo back to the team.

On Monday, Attanasio said the new logo has some modernizations. “We are looking to win the World Series with this ball and glove,” he said.

Milwaukee unveiled four uniform combinations Monday. A solid cream-colored home uniform and a home pinstripe variety. Those two were worn by Ryan Braun and Brandon Woodruff. Brewers is spelled out in block lettering on the front in both navy and gold.

Keston Hiura donned one of the team’s road uniforms: a solid gray road uniform, and Brent Suter wore a variation that included a navy blue top with gold lettering and a navy blue cap with a gold facing. Suter’s uniform featured Milwaukee in a classic cursive script, and Hiura’s featured Milwaukee in block letters.

Logo History

The Milwaukee Brewers have had several different logo iterations over their 50 years. People strongly identify with some, while others came when the team wasn’t playing all that well. Here is a brief history:

Barrelman

From 1970-1977, the Brewers official logo was the Barrelman, a baseball-bat swinging mascot with a beer keg for a torso. It was the original logo from the American Association Milwaukee Brewers team that played at Borchert Field in the 40s.

Ball And Glove

In 1978, the Brewers hosted a contest to design a new logo. The team had worn the classic “M” logo on caps and helmets to that point and were looking for something new. UW-Eau Claire art history student Tom Meindel designed the classic “ball and glove” logo that fans love today. The “ball and glove” logo would forever be linked to the 1982 AL Championship team and players such as Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Jim Gantner, Pete Vukovich, Rollie Fingers and manager Harvey Kuenn.

Interlocking MB Logo

The 90s saw the Brewers drop the “ball and glove” logo for a new design. From 1994-1999, the team donned an interlocking “M and B” logo that introduced gold, navy blue and green into its uniform. This logo was worn by players at the height of the steroid era in Major League Baseball, was worn during the final years of play at Milwaukee County Stadium and during the team’s transition from the American League to the National League. The Brewers would not play to a winning record while wearing this logo.

Miller Park-Era Logo

In 2000, one year before moving to Miller Park, the Brewers did a full uniform re-do, adopting the “M” logo with a modern twist – adding a stalk of barley – a key ingredient in beer – beneath the script while keeping the navy blue and gold coloring. They would keep this design scheme up until the 2019 season. During the last few years, popularity for the classic “ball and glove” logo grew. The team introduced “Flashback Fridays” in 2006, and brought back the old logo and sometimes those powder-blue road uniforms.

The uniforms will forever be associated with four National League playoff teams, and players such as C.C. Sabathia, Prince Fielder, Ryan Braun, Ben Sheets, Christian Yelich and many others.


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